NSU students on spiraling tuition: “This should be fixed now” – Affordable College Tuition
NSU students on spiraling tuition: “This should be fixed now”

At Norfolk State University, resource-strapped students feeling the pain of college tuition debt loads are speaking out, and speaking with ACT Now! on camera.

“I can’t get my car fixed, my phone is broke, and I can’t get a new one right now. My house payment is kind of late, bills are kind of late,” said one student.

That same student expressed concern that lawmakers are out of touch with the reality of the average young person.

“I feel like the government is not really seeing what everyday people are going through, and that they can raise it so quickly for everyday people, it’s hard. I don’t think it’s fair, especially when I just want to get an education to get a job, and then I feel like as soon as I get my job, I’m not able to provide for myself like I want to because I have to pay back loans,” said a concerned student.

For another student, the possibility of not having a job upon graduation – paired with the burden of student loans – is a scenario that is extremely hard to bear.

“I mean, we’re young, and some people, in reality, aren’t going to have a job once they graduate. So what are they going to do with the debt, on top of not having a job?” she said.

Virginia has the sixth-highest tuition in the U.S., and tuition and fees at state-supported Virginia colleges and universities have gone up 74 percent over the last decade.

Those and other dire statistics are creating a sense of urgency and desperation for many students who are urging lawmakers to take action on tuition reform.

“This should be fixed now, because there are many students that aren’t able to go to college where they’d like or where it would be easiest for them to attend because they simply do not have the financial resources for it,” said one student.

To sign our petition telling elected officials you support higher education reform, visit our ACTion Center here.


Transcript of NSU student interviews:

Q: How has student debt affected you?

Student 1: I can’t get my car fixed, my phone is broke, I can’t get a new one right now. House payment is kind of late, bills kind of late.

Student 2: I mean, we’re young and some people – in reality – aren’t going to have a job once they graduate, so what are they going to do with the debt, on top of not having a job?

Student 3: This should be fixed now, because there are many students that aren’t able to go to college where they’d like or where it would be easiest for them to attend because they simply do not have the financial resources for it.

Student 1: I feel like the government is not really seeing what everyday people are going through, and that they can raise it so quickly for everyday people, it’s hard. I don’t think it’s fair, especially when I just want to get an education to get a job, and then I feel like as soon as I get my job, I’m not able to provide for myself like I want to because I have to pay back loans.